Qigong Healing Center
Gary W. Abersold 

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Legendary Healers of Traditional Chinese Medicine


Four famous Traditional Healers are revered in the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine. They are Bian Que, Huatuo, Sun Simiao, and Li Shizhen. Read more below:


 Bian Que: Bian Que is the earliest known physician, from China's Warring States period, from 770 to 221BC. According to historical texts, Bian Que had supernormal abilities to see through the human body; coines as xray vision. He's the founder of the pulse-taking diagnosis. Legend has it that Bian Que revived the crown prince of the state of Guo; believed to be dead. Using pulse diagnosis, Bian Que found the prince was in a coma and treated him with acupuncture. Thus, Bian Que was known as "the doctor who brings the dead back to life."


Hua Tuo: A extremely important fgure to modern Qigong; Hua Tuo is known as China's first surgeon, living during the late Han Dynasty and early Three Kingdoms era. According to historical texts, Hua Tuo was called the "Divine physician" or "Shenyi" in Chinese. Hua Tuo invented Ma Fei San; an anesthetic drug used to reduce pain during surgery.


One legendary story has it that Hua Tuo treated Guan Yu, the famous general of Emperor Liu Bei in the Shu state during the Three Kingdoms period. A poisoned arrow had injured Guan's right arm during a battle. Hua Tuo applied anesthetic, made a cut in Guan's right arm, and then cut away the poisoned part of the flesh. The surgery was done while Guan was playing a board game. According to historical accounts, Hua Tuo saw a tumor in Cao Cao's brain and suggested brain surgery. But Cao Cao ruler of the Wei state during the Three Kingdoms era thought Hua Tuo wanted to kill him. He imprisoned Hua Tuo who died in prison. Later Cao Cao died of this illness. Hua Tuo is also known for developing "Wu Qin Xi" The famous Five Animals Frolics Healing exercises.


Sun Simiao: Sun Simao is one of the most influential physicians in the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and is distinguished by his application of medicine and his adherence to an ethical code. His interest in medicine came from his own fragile health whereby he treated himself as his first patient. His mastery of medicine, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism made Emperor Wen of the Sui Dynasty, and Emperors Tai-zong and Gao-zu of the Tang Dynasty seek him out as an imperial physician. However, Sun Simiao declined these posts and devoted his life to being a physician who served the common people. He believed the best way to care for a patient was to prevent an illness before it occurred. The worst care was to treat an illness that had already occurred because it meant that he was unable to keep his patient healthy.


Sun Simiao's best known works are Qianjin Yaofang (Prescriptions Worth a Thousand Gold for Emergencies or Precious Prescriptions for Emergencies) and the Qianjin Yifang (A Supplement to the Essential Prescriptions Worth a Thousand Gold or Supplement to Precious Prescriptions). The first book is comprised of 30 volumes and lists 5,300 prescriptions. The second book is also made up of 30 volumes and lists 2,571 prescriptions. Sun Simiao's observations about diseases and his prescribed treatments are noteworthy even today. For example, he knew cholera and diarrhea were caused by what people ate and drank and not by "evil spirits" as was commonly thought. He correctly identified tuberculosis as a lung disease, which was a new concept of this time. After successfully treating 600 cases of leprosy, he is considered the earliest expert on this disease in China.


Sun Simiao is also renowned for his identification and treatment of deficiency disorders. Even though he was not exactly sure of the cause of goiter (hypothyroidism caused by lack of iodine), he knew it occurred in people who lived in certain mountainous regions and drank unsanitary water. He prescribed medicine from the thyroid glands of deer and sheep because they are high in iodine content. Nyctalopia, which is night blindness caused by lack of vitamin A, was successfully treated with pig, calf and sheep livers that contain large amounts of this vitamin. He is the first person in the medical history to document the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Beriberi, a deficiency disease caused by lack of vitamin B1. For this, he prescribed combinations of herbs that were high in Vitamin B1.


The elderly also benefited from Sun Simiao because he was a strong advocate for maintaining health throughout a person's life. He thought life could be prolonged with measures such as performing daily Qigong, regular physical exercise, and massage therapy. He advised against excessive drinking, eating raw meat, and spitting in public. He also believed diet therapy should be tried before resorting to medicine.


Other advances made by Sun Simiao were in the areas of acupuncture, moxibustion and pharmacy. He thought moxibustion should be performed prior to acupuncture, and he was successful in determining essential acupuncture points. Sun Simiao also combined acupuncture with drug therapy, and stressed using the ashi point, which is still used by acupuncturists today. His knowledge of herbs was vast, and he insisted on harvesting them in the proper season and processing them correctly. The nickname "king of pharmacology" or 'king of prescriptions" was given to him because he was especially knowledgeable in preparation of medicinal herbs. 


Li Shizhen: Li Shizhen from the Ming Dynasty is one of the greatest Chinese herbalists. He's regarded as the father of traditional Chinese medicine and the patron saint of Chinese herbal medicine. Li's key contribution is the "Compendium of Herbs" or "Bencao Gangmu" in Chinese.


The book covers nearly 1900 (1892) different herbs in 60 different categories. In ancient China, these great physicians were said to have had supernatural abilities. They could see through the human body with the Third Eye. According to traditional Chinese thought, this third eye is located in the forehead, slightly above and in between the eyebrows, and can be activated through spiritual cultivation practice. While this is a mystical concept, the Third Eye is part of the Pineal gland. Today, modern medical science recognizes that the front part of the Pineal gland contains the exact structure of a human eye.

Posted by qigonghealing on January 6, 2017 at 12:46 AM 359 Views